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Posts Tagged ‘george marsden’

Marsden on Edwards and Beauty

George Marsden is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History Emeritus at University of Notre Dame and he gave the first lecture in the “Jonathan Edwards and the Church” series (cosponsored with the Henry Center for Theological Understanding). In his lecture, he set the stage with a picture of Benjamin Franklin’s modernity as it was deeply shaped by emerging enlightenment and modern trends. Against this backdrop, his contemporary Jonathan Edwards posed a sharp contrast, the last of the Puritan theologians responding in his own way to a changing world, which Marsden fleshed out as a Edwards’s brilliant ‘theology of active beauty.’ Colin Smith, the pastor of the Orchard Evangelical Free Church, probed in response to Dr. Marsden’s lecture how pastors can help people move from the religion of Franklin to the faith of Edwards. The exchange between these two men was very stimulating to all in attendance.


A free audio and video of this lecture will be available soon.

Jonathan Edwards and the Church: Opening Lecture by George Marsden

The Jonathan Edwards Center at TEDS is pleased to announce its first lecture in the “Jonathan Edwards and the Church” series. George Marsden, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History Emeritus at University of Notre Dame, will be giving a lecture on Edwards and beauty.

The lecture will be on November 3, 2010 at 1pm at the ATO chapel on the campus of TEDS; it is free and all are welcome.

Pastor Colin Smith of the Orchard Evangelical Free Church (Arlington Heights, IL) will be responding to Dr. Marsden’s lecture.

This lecture series is co-sponsored with the Henry Center for Theological Understanding.

Jonathan Edwards for the Twenty-first Century

Abstract: What are the most helpful insights that we can gain from Jonathan Edwards’s theology today? This lecture uses the contrast between Benjamin Franklin and Jonathan Edwards in the eighteenth century to reflect on some of the most characteristic traits of later American culture to which Edwards’s “theology of active beauty” provides particularly helpful alternatives.