From the JEC Blog

Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

“The Miscellanies Project”: A Call for Contributors

MiscellaniesProjectBanner

 

 

The Jonathan Edwards Society is extending a call for contributors to The Miscellanies Project and Reader. Deadline for topic submission is Dec 1, 2017. Details about the project and signup are available at http://www.jesociety.org/project/.

 

 

2017 Graduate Student Paper Competition Winner

Jonathan-Edwards-banner_680x195

We are pleased to announce the winner of this year’s Jonathan Edwards graduate student paper competition.

Kerley-photoWe received papers this year from graduate students all over the world. The competition was stiff. But the winner of this year’s prize is Tyler Kerley, an MDiv Candidate at Beeson Divinity School, in Birmingham, AL.

Tyler’s paper is entitled, “The Beauty of the Cross: Retrieving Penal Substitutionary Atonement on Jonathan Edwards’ Aesthetic Basis.”

His paper appropriates Edwardsian atonement in order to respond to recent criticisms of the penal substitutionary motif within systematic theology. By placing Edwards against Anselm’s Cur Deus Homo? and John Stott’s The Cross of Christ, it becomes clear that Edwards has an alternative vision of the atonement. Edwardsian atonement deflects the criticisms of penal substitutionary atonement made by postmodern theologians, such as those stated in Mark Baker and Joel Green’s The Scandal of the Cross. This paper, therefore, represents a gesture toward the wealth of untapped, potential resources in Edwards’ thought for broader concerns in postmodern philosophy and theology.

Tyler will receive a check for $1,000 and publication of his essay soon in Jonathan Edwards Studies.

Congratulations, Tyler, on a job well done!

 

 

Call for Papers: Jonathan Edwards and the Dark Side of the Enlightenment

NewDirectionsBanner

Call For Papers:

 

Jonathan Edwards and the Dark Side of the Enlightenment

Edited by Daniel N. Gullotta and John T. Lowe

 

To be published in “New Directions in Jonathan Edwards Studies” (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht) in cooperation with the Jonathan Edwards Studies at Yale University

 

The editors of the proposed volume, Jonathan Edwards and the Dark Side of the Enlightenment, are seeking chapter contributions of 5000-7000 words. Chapters should focus on Jonathan Edwards’ in relation to some subject of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. Suggested topics include: political economy and the expansion of trade and/or capitalism; language, epistemology and the organization of knowledge; human rights, and thinking about war and peace; slavery and the question of racism; the place of women in the home and in the church; international relations; the social hierarchy; hysteria, superstition, and pseudo-science; poverty and the marginal of society; anthropocentrism and ecological dominance; Native Americans and colonialism; British imperialism; etc. Other related but not listed topics would be welcomed as well. The chapters shall be arranged into thematic sections. Contributors must use The Chicago Manual of Style and conform to the norms of the Jonathan Edwards Center (see the Jonathan Edwards Studies Journal).

 

Deadline for Abstracts: Apr. 30th, 2017.

300 Words and CV sent to daniel.gullotta@gmail.com and lowejohnthomas@gmail.com.

Answer to Authors: May 31th, 2017.

Full Chapters to Submitted: Dec. 31st, 2017.

See the Official Call for Papers.

2016 Graduate Student Paper Competition Winner

Jonathan-Edwards-banner_680x195Emily Dolan Gierer photo

We are pleased to announce the winner of this year’s Jonathan Edwards graduate student paper competition.

We received papers this year from graduate students all over the world. The competition was stiff. But the winner of this year’s prize is Emily Dolan Gierer, a Master of Divinity student at Yale Divinity School.

Gierer’s paper is entitled, “Monstrous Confessions: Seventeenth-Century Women and the Dangers of Divine Revelation.”

Her paper is based on a study of the public confessions of faith recorded by Pastor Thomas Shepard (1605-1649) for his Puritan parishioners in Cambridge, Massachusetts between 1638 and 1645. Gierer argues in her paper that the 51 confessions Shepard recorded during this period “evidence a group of people who were cautiously intentional in their word choices, particularly in the case of the female confessors. For many of the women in Cambridge, their faith confession was the first and only experience of speaking in public that would ever be offered to them. Despite their lack of public speaking experience, they had to speak confidently, yet modestly, of their religious experiences in a community that generally considered it unbiblical for a woman to speak in church. By examining the fifty-one public confessions of faith, and particularly the twenty-two given by women,” Gierer highlights “the rhetorical tactics these women used to protect themselves from accusations of immodesty and even heresy. Relying heavily on references to scripture and sermons in their accounts, the women of Cambridge carefully situated the authority for their religious experiences” in a manner that comported with the patriarchal culture of early New England, setting the stage on which the women of Northampton would participate in its much more public membership debate a century later.

Gierer will receive a check for $500 and publication of her essay soon in Jonathan Edwards Studies.

Congratulations, Emily, on a job well done!