Sweeney’s Booknotes—Everyday Glory: The Revelation of God in All of Reality

Gerald R. McDermott, Everyday Glory: The Revelation of God in All of Reality (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2018).

McDermott_EverydayGloryThis is not a book on Edwards. Nor does it offer original research into Edwards or his context. But it is written by one of the best Edwards scholars at work today, and offers fascinating reflections on the nature of reality from an Edwardsean perspective.

“Many years ago,” McDermott writes, he “happened upon a notebook” Edwards kept throughout his life. “He titled [it] ‘Images of Divine Things.’ In this notebook, now about eighty-five pages, Edwards jotted notes on the resemblances to the Triune God and his ways that he saw in the world around him.” McDermott “was immediately enthralled,” he confesses.

This notebook opened a whole new world to me. I began to see beauty and riches in the stars above and the world beneath and pointers to gospel truths in multiple dimensions of reality. Later when I started to explore the history of Christian thought, I discovered that this Edwardsean way of seeing the world was not uncommon in previous Christian theology. In fact, it was the norm (p. vii).

It has since been lost, though, at least to most moderns. Everyday Glory is an effort to recover it.

Here is a look at the table of contents, which provides a sure sense as to the scale of what McDermott calls his “typological” vision (taken from Edwards’ understanding of the “types”/pointers/emblems of divinity around us):

Chapter 1. Recovering a Lost Vision
Chapter 2. The Bible: A World of Types, Keys to Types in All the Worlds
Chapter 3. Nature: Sermons in Stones
Chapter 4. Science: The Wonder of the Universe
Chapter 5. Law: The Moral Argument
Chapter 6. History: Images of God in the Histories of Peoples
Chapter 7. Animals: The Zoological World Bursting with Signs
Chapter 8. Sex: The Language of the Body
Chapter 9. Sports: Its Agonies and Ecstasies
Chapter 10. World Religions: So Similar and Yet So Different
Chapter 11. A New World: Believing Is Seeing
Appendix: Theological Objections–Luther and Barth

Those not interested in theology may struggle with this book. It is written in a clear style, accessible to all. But its message is counterintuitive. As I wrote in an endorsement:

The ‘natural’ world McDermott describes is the world I want to inhabit—and sometimes do. Profound faith is required of those who want to live there constantly, far more faith than most moderns are able to muster every day. But for those with eyes to see and ears to hear its wondrous beauty, it is gleaming with an eternal weight of glory that exceeds our paltry efforts to reproduce, abstract, or counteract it. It enchants the bodily senses—and awakens the spiritual senses— with its still-too elusive satisfactions.

Taste and see.

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