From the JEC Blog

Sweeney’s Booknotes—Jonathan Edwards: Spiritual Writings

Jonathan Edwards, Spiritual Writings, ed. Kyle C. Strobel, Adriaan C. Neele, and Kenneth P. Minkema, The Classics of Western Spirituality (New York: Paulist Press, 2019).

Edwards_Spiritual WritingsAt long last, Paulist Press has published Edwards in its series of The Classics of Western Spirituality—a world famous list pushing 130 volumes that, until now, included nothing by the sage of Northampton.

Expertly edited by three leading scholars of Edwards’ work, this anthology has selections from Edwards’ best-known spiritual writings and a few long-hidden treasures published here for the first time. Here’s a look at the table of contents:

 

Prelude: Locating Jonathan Edwards’s Spirituality (Neele)

Introduction (Strobel)

 

Part One: The General Contours of Edwards’s Spirituality

Introduction to Part One

“Diary”

“Resolutions”

“Personal Narrative” (1740)

Excerpt from A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of God (1737)

The Spiritual Enjoyments and Comforts Believers Have through Christ (1738)

 

Part Two: Affections

Introduction to Part Two

Excerpt from A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections (1746)

Spiritual Appetites Need No Bounds (1729)

The Saints Often Miss Sweet Communion with Christ (1737)

Excerpt from The Portion of the Righteous (1735)

“Apostrophe to Sarah Pierpont”

“The Narrative of Sarah Pierpont Edwards”

 

Part Three: Beauty

Introduction to Part Three

“Miscellanies” no. a, “Of Holiness”

Excerpts from “Types” Notebook

The Sweet Harmony of Christ (1735)

Fragment: Application on Love to Christ (1723)

Letter to Lady Mary Pepperrell (1751)

Excerpt from Charity and Its Fruits (1738)

 

Part Four: Means of Grace

Introduction to Part Four

The Duty of Self-Examination (1722-23)

God’s Wisdom in His Stated Method of Bestowing Grace (1729)

“Miscellanies” no. 539, “Means of Grace”

Striving After Perfection (1735)

A Native American Profession of Faith

Letter to Deborah Hatheway (1741)

 

Part Five: The Internal and External Work of Grace

Introduction to Part Five

A Spiritual Understanding of Divine Things Denied to the Unregenerate (1723)

“Directions for Judging of Persons’ Experiences”

True Grace Is Divine (1738)

Excerpt from “Treatise on Grace” (1739-42)

Excerpt from “Miscellanies” no. 790, “Signs of Godliness” (c. 1740)

Excerpt from Extraordinary Gifts of the Spirit Are Inferior to Graces of the Spirit (1748)

Excerpts from True and False Christians (On the Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins) (1737-38)

 

The items published here for the first time include the sermons titled The Spiritual Enjoyments and Comforts Believers Have through Christ, The Saints Often Miss Sweet Communion with Christ, and True Grace Is Divine. Also, The Portion of the Righteous, another sermon, is published here in a version much improved over its nineteenth-century ancestor.

This is now essential reading for all serious Edwards scholars, suggested reading for those interested in Christian spirituality, and, when released in paperback, it will make a fine textbook for classes on Edwards and/or Protestant spiritual history. Highly recommended.

Sweeney’s Booknotes—New England Dogmatics

New England Dogmatics: A Systematic Collection of Questions and Answers in Divinity by Maltby Gelston (1766-1865), ed. Robert L. Boss, Joshua R. Farris, and S. Mark Hamilton (Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, 2019).

New England DogmaticsThis is a goldmine for students of the New Divinity (the theological movement that stemmed from Edwards’ life and work).

It contains three lists of questions in dogmatic theology used with ministerial hopefuls and other students in New England: two lists by Jonathan Edwards and one by Jonathan Edwards, Jr., all of which are also available in the online edition of The Works of Jonathan Edwards.

The book’s main contribution is that it also offers the answersto the questions of Edwards, Jr., as penned by Maltby Gelston in a notebook that has long lain unpublished in the Sterling Memorial Library at Yale.

After graduating from Yale College in 1791, Gelston lived for three years in the home of Edwards, Jr., then a pastor in New Haven, for more ministerial training. Edwards ran the young Gelston through his theological paces with the help of an impressive list of 313 questions in theology, which, taken together, open a window onto the values of the Edwardsean tradition in New England. Gelston would go on to serve for more than 45 years as the pastor of the Congregational church in Sherman, Connecticut.

The book’s editors are all up-and-coming Edwards scholars: Robert Boss is the founder and Executive Director of JESociety.org; Joshua Farris is a professor at Houston Baptist University; and Mark Hamilton is a recently-minted Ph.D. from the Free University of Amsterdam (who has already published both on Edwards and the Edwardseans). Their introduction to the volume includes a biographical sketch of Maltby Gelston’s life and work and an analysis of his answers on the doctrine of the atonement. It uses Edwards’/Gelston’s answers to contribute to the ongoing debate about the nature and significance of the Edwardseans’ so-called Calvinistic moral government theory of the atonement (pp. 1-49).

Several scholars have written about the pastoral mentorships that characterized the Edwardsean tradition in the years during and after the Great Awakening. Here is the summary offered by Yale’s Kenneth P. Minkema in a “Foreword” written for this volume:

It was common practice for a student, having finished his baccalaureate work, to supplement or extend his training and experience, either before going on for a master’s degree, or while pursuing it. This period was called “rusticating.” The student would identify an established pastor who ran a school of the prophets [i.e. a mentorship program] with whom he wanted to live for a time–usually a year or so–during which he would be part of the minister’s family, try his hand at preaching, visitation, and other pastoral duties, and witness the domestic, social, and professional life of an ordained leader in all its aspects. He would also, under his mentor’s direction, engage in further study (p. ix).

Nary a single modern scholar has ever written about Gelston, so here is what I wrote for the book’s back cover:

Maltby Gelston is one of the most important New Divinity scholars about whom most have never heard–primarily because of his book of questions and answers in divinity written for Jonathan Edwards, Jr., his pastoral mentor. This material, published here for the very first time, opens a whole new window onto the world of the Edwardseans, reminding us of a time and place quite different from our own, where the details of Christian doctrine were matters of life and death or, in the words of Harriet Beecher Stowe, “all was profoundly real and vital,–a foundation on which actual life was based with intensest earnestness.”

Everyone who wants to know more about the New Divinity schools of the prophets and their theological fruits will want to read this groundbreaking volume.

Sweeney’s Booknotes—A New Divinity: Transatlantic Reformed Evangelical Debates during the Long Eighteenth Century

Mark Jones and Michael A. G. Haykin (eds.), A New Divinity: Transatlantic Reformed Evangelical Debates during the Long Eighteenth Century (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 2018).

New DivinitySince Doug Sweeney is a contributor to the volume under review, this booknote is written by Joey Cochran, assistant director of the Jonathan Edwards Center and doctoral student of Doug Sweeney’s. 

Editors Mark Jones and Michael Haykin have assembled a crack squad of theologically minded historians to trace the stories of significant ecclesiological and theological debates during the “Long” 18th Century. Though these discussions lend themselves broadly to Calvinistic traditions in Britain and New England, these debates represent both confessional and non-confessional backgrounds. The editors wish for this study to be an aid for today’s churchmen and scholars to assess how to best navigate our day’s ecclesiological and theological disputes.

Since the nature of the Jonathan Edwards Center blog pivots on the figure of Edwards, this booknote will primarily address the fifth chapter contribution from Daniel W. Cooley and Douglas A. Sweeney. A fundamental premise of the authors in this chapter is that Edwards Sr. modeled a methodology of theological reflection open to adaptation. His theological heirs apparent (literally in this case) adopted the practice of adaptation and included it in their theological toolkit.

New Divinity theology had the hallmark of distinguishing natural ability and moral inability, along with asserting a doctrine of immediate repentance. Edwards Sr.’s understanding of imputation of Adam’s sin followed an Augustino-Federal theology of original sin. However, the New Divinity theologians that followed him shifted to a view where guilt is derived from personal sin alone.

This then becomes the avenue by which the penal substitutionary view of atonement might be eclipsed by the moral government view. The chapter authors indicate that Edwards Jr. pioneered this view of the atonement sometime in the 1780s as a viable polemic against the trending universalism of his day. (See Michael McClymond’s stout two-volume study, The Devil’s Redemption, for more on the history and interpretation of universalism.)

Edwards Jr. viewed the payment of the debt for sin as metaphorical. Rather than emphasizing substitution, “the atonement is about restoring God’s divine rule” in which his moral government set by his moral law is upheld (120). He proposed that God’s general justice—where his moral goodness is upheld by God conducting himself in a manner in which he seeks his own glory and provides for the universe’s good—is in mind with the moral government view of atonement. General justice necessitates vindicating God’s true virtue. Thus, Edwards Jr. retrieves both of Edwards Sr.’s two dissertations, a post-humous publication impossible apart from the help of none other than Edwards Jr., in order to facilitate a moral government view of the atonement (cf. Yeager, Jonathan Edwards and Transatlantic Print Culture).

The chapter authors make clear that Edwards Jr. does not forsake substitution altogether in his moral government view. This view of substitution protected against universalism by clarifying that the payment to God was not for each individual sinner. Rather, it is Christ’s sufferings that are substituted for the punishment justly due to humanity, which clears the way for individual conversion. In other words, the locus of substitution is relocated from ontology to mission. Though Edwards Sr. spoke in more conservative Reformed-scholastic terms that indeed merged Anselmic and Grotian themes, father and son agreed that atonement ought to restore God’s honor and express God’s character.

Akin to how the humanists of the later 15th and early 16th century might best be understood as purveyors of a methodology, one might argue that Edwards’ ability to adapt, in the 18th century’s new era of science and enlightenment, served as an exemplar for his theological heirs and in itself may have been one of the most powerful influences of “America’s Theologian.”

I heartily recommend the rest of the chapter contributions in this fine collection. This work is an asset for scholars and churchmen concerned about developments and disputations of doctrine in the long 18th century. Perusing the book’s table of contents provides a depiction of the broad landscape that this compendium offers:

Editors Introduction | Mark Jones / Michael A. G. Haykin

1 The Antinomian-Neonomian Controversy in Nonconforming England (c. 1690) | Mark Jones / D. Patrick Ramsey

2 The Marrow Controversy | William VanDoodewaard

3 “A catholic spirit”: George Whitefield’s Dispute with the Erskines in Scotland | Ian Hugh Clary

4 The Doctrine of Free Choice | HyunKwan Kim

5 The Edwardseans and the Atonement | Daniel W. Cooley / Douglas A. Sweeney

6 The “Modern Question”: Hyper-Calvinism | Paul Helm

7 Eschatology: Spes Meliorum Temporum | Mark A. Herzer

8 The Particular Baptist Battle Over Sandemanianism | Nathan A. Finn

9 Andrew Fuller and the Fading of the Trinitarian Imagination | Michael A. G. Haykin

10 Church Authority and Subscription in the Synod of Philadelphia (1721-1741) | Scott Sealy

11 The Legacy of John Witherspoon and the Founding of Princeton Theological Seminary: Samuel Stanhope Smith, Ashbel Green, and the Contested Meaning of Enlightened Education | Paul Kjoss Helseth

12 Is Revival from God? The Great Awakening Debate Between Two Moderates | Robert Smart

Yale University hosts “Yale and the International Jonathan Edwards” Conference

On Oct. 2-4, 2019, Yale University will host the “Yale and the International Jonathan Edwards” conference.

This conference brings together the directors of the international Edwards Center affiliates from around the world, along with prominent scholars and religious leaders, to assess the state of Edwards Studies and discern areas for future work.

The “Yale and the International Jonathan Edwards” conference is free and open to the public, but please register in advance.

REGISTER NOW >

Questions about the conference? Email edwards@yale.edu.

Visit the conference website for the most up-to-date schedule along with list of panelists. Below is the tentative schedule.

Yale and the International Jonathan Edwards Conference Schedule

October 2

5:00 p.m: Greetings by Dean Gregory Sterling and Prof. Harry Stout

Opening Keynote

  • George M. Marsden, University of Notre Dame  (Emeritus)

6:00: Reception

October 3

8:00 a.m.: Continental Breakfast

8:30: Session I: United States and Canada

  • Douglas Sweeney, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, JEC-Midwest USA
  • Chris Chun, Gateway Seminary, Los Angeles, JEC-USA West
  • Oliver Crisp, Fuller Seminary, JEC-USA West
  • Kyle Strobel, Biola University, JEC-USA West
  • Ava Chamberlain, Wright State University

10:30: Break

11:00: Session II: Africa

  • Adriaan C. Neele, Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary
  • Victor Emma-Adamah, Cambridge University, JEC-Africa

12:30: Lunch

1:30: Session III: Asia & Australia

  • Rhys Bezzant, Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia, JEC-Australia
  • Peter Jung, Independent Scholar, Atlanta, Ga.
  • Anri Morimoto, International Christian University, Japan, JEC-Japan

3:00: Session V: Eastern Europe

  • Joel Burnell, Evangelical School of Theology, Wroclaw, Poland, JEC-Poland
  • Michael Choinski, Jagiellonian University, JEC-Poland
  • Tibor Fabiny, Károli Gáspár University, Budapest, Hungary, JEC-Hungary
  • Gerald McDermott, Beeson Divinity School

4:30: Plenary Address

  • Mark Noll, University of Notre Dame (Emeritus)

Dinner on your own

October 4

8:00 a.m.: Continental Breakfast

8:30: Session VI: South America

  • Heber De Campos, Mackenzie University, São Paulo, Brazil, JEC-Brazil
  • Franklin Ferreira, Mackenzie University, São Paulo, Brazil, JEC-Brazil

9:30: Break

10:00 Session VII: Western Europe & the United Kingdom

  • Andreas Beck, Evangelical Theological Faculty, Leuven, Belgium, JEC-Benelux
  • Philip Fisk, Evangelical Theological Faculty, Leuven, Belgium, JEC-Benelux
  • Daniel Hill, University of Liverpool, JEC-UK
  • Crawford Gribben, Queen’s University, Belfast, JEC-UK
  • Michael McClenahan, Union Theological College, Northern Ireland
  • Jan Stievermann, University of Heidelberg, Germany, JEC-Germany
  • Willem Van Vlastuin, Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, JEC-Benelux

12:30: Lunch

Free time (explore New Haven’s museums, art galleries, and other sites, including special exhibit of Edwards manuscripts at Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library)

4:00: Session VIII: Closing Keynote (TBD)

  • Rev. Rick Warren, Saddleback Church, Lake Forest, Cal.

5:00: Closing Reception (Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.)